GALLERY


Doris McCarthy Gallery

Photographs and sculptures by Darrin Martin, a video and photographs by Carmen Papalia, and prints by Louise Bourgeois installed throughout a gallery room. In the middle, mannequins are covered in a stretchy black "body sock" by Sara Hendren. Green and red versions are hung nearby.

Installation view of The Flesh of the World at the Doris McCarthy. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.

Sara Hendren's body socks surrounded by prints by Louise Bourgeois and videos by Katherine Araniello, Arseli Dokumaci, Lisa Bufano and Jason Tschantré.
Installation view of The Flesh of the World at the Doris McCarthy. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.

Sculptural tongues displayed on a wall with wires connected to them.
Ingrid Bachmann, Pinocchio’s Dilemma, 2007. Cast resin, 8 servo motors, 2 Arduino microcontrollers, metal, Plexiglas, plastic. Courtesy of the artist. Installed at the Doris McCarthy Gallery. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.

Two-channel video projected side-by-side at a 90 degree angle. On the left, a pair of identical twins are each looking through a stereoscope. On the right, a black and white photo of a child layered on a hazy image of orange plants and flowers.
Darrin Martin, The Divide, 2015. Two-channel video installation. Courtesy of the artist. Installed at the Doris McCarthy Gallery. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.


Justina M. Barnicke Gallery

Installation view of photographs by Tim Lee and Alexa Wright and video documentation of Mowry Baden's Seatbelt sculptures in use. In the middle, a black TV monitor is placed on the floor.
Installation view of The Flesh of the World at the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.

In a gallery space, video by Tim Lee is playing on a black TV monitor on the floor. On its left, Mowry Baden's Seat Belt with Pole and Two Straps. Both surrounded with photographs by Martin Kersels and Alexa Wright.
Installation view of The Flesh of the World at the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.

Scrap materials scattered throughout the gallery. From left to right: a broken wooden chair, a white cardboard box and two piles of materials on two half-circle white platforms, a broken cardboard wheel with an upright wooden stick, objects worn by the artist during her performance placed on a red chair, and a broken mannequin foot with various materials attached to it.
Raphaëlle de Groot, The Wait – Experimenting Expectation, 2015. Durational performance with audience participation, collection of materials, found objects and accessories; video documentation. Courtesy of the artist. Installed at the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.


University of Toronto Art Centre

Inside a gallery room, from left to right: video by Catherine Richards, video of basketball players dribbling by Wendy Jacob projected above an orange platform resembling a basketball court, and a wall-mounted projector-like object with a sculptural leg suspended from its lens with a rope of rubber bands.
Installation view of The Flesh of the World at the University of Toronto Art Centre. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.

Installation view of two works by Martin Kersels: a wall-mounted projector-like object with a sculptural leg suspended from its lens with a rope of rubber bands and a video of a drummer covered in an oversized purple garment. Also visible, two works in the adjacent gallery: one of Mowry Baden's Seatbelt sculptures and a video documentation of the series in use.
Installation view of The Flesh of the World at the University of Toronto Art Centre. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.

A video by Aaron Williamson and to its left eight light-brown vests hung on the wall with wires hanging off of them.
Installation view of The Flesh of the World at the University of Toronto Art Centre. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.

A white room with a low glass table in the middle. A neatly folded copper fabric placed on its centre.
Catherine Richards, Shroud Chrysalis I, 2000. Glass table, copper taffeta, two female attendants. Dimensions variable. Collection of The Ottawa Art Gallery; Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance program, Glen Bloom and OAG’s Endowment Fund, 2004. Installed at the University of Toronto Art Centre. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.

Series of white sculptural instruments that resemble stools sitting upside down on the floor. They surround a projected video of a woman.
Erin Gee, Swarming Emotional Pianos, 2012-ongoing. Aluminum tubes, servo motors, custom mallets, Arduino-based electronics, iCreate platforms. Approximately 68.6 x 30.5 x 30.5 cm each. Custom biosensors that collect heart rate and signal amplitude, respiration amplitude and rate, and galvanic skin response (sweat). Biodata collection software and affective data responsive algorithmic music software built in Max/MSP. Courtesy of the artistΩ, installed at the University of Toronto Art Centre. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.

A two-channel video of two men break-dancing projected on white screens suspended with wires.
Helen Dowling, Breaker, 2008. Video installation. Courtesy of the artist. Installed at the University of Toronto Art Centre. Photograph by Toni Hafkenscheid.